Category: Bread (Page 2 of 2)

Breakin’ Bread: Artisan Breads with Capistrano’s

Join Heidi in the second video of our series on Breakin’ Bread as she visits our friends at Capistrano’s Bakery to see how artisan breads, and specifically the renowned Julien Baquettes, are made for your local grocery store or restaurant.

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This Breakin’ Bread is sponsored by Capistrano’s Bakery.

Capistrano’s Featured Bread: The Julien Baguette

by David Lee

A baguette, translated as “wand” or “stick,” refers to a particular type of loaf that is long, crispy, crusty and closely associated with France. Of course we see them now in grocery stores everywhere, and the best for us comes in the form of the Julien Baguette from Capistranos’.

Apparently, the French government has attempted to create a defining law regulating what a baguette represents but has not been entirely successful. Still, under French standards, the name baguette can only be used for bread made from lean dough made of four ingredients which are flour, kitchen salt, water and yeast. Traditionally, the loaf is about 2 1/2 feet long weighing in at just under 8 ounces.

The baguette is one of the simplest to make but one the most difficult to perfect. Lengthy fermentation is necessary to develop the complex flavor of the well made baguette. Two methods can be used to achieve this; 1) a pre-ferment starter, or 2) overnight fermenting for what is called a first rising.  Of course, the two techniques can be combined.

The crumb, a random distribution of holes of various shapes and sizes, is desirable in a baguette. Hydration and a bit of kneading accomplish this. Most recipes call for just a few minutes of kneading time to develop the gluten in the bread if there is a proper amount of water to develop the strands.

The appearance of the loaves is a result of the formation process of rolling the dough and scoring (slicing) the loaves immediately prior to baking and, of course, the baking method itself.

Scoring, traditionally, is also a way of identifying the baker. The story goes that, back in the day, when people shared ovens, they had to add their own mark to know which of the loaves were theirs.

The baguette is different from other French breads because of its baking process. Hearth style breads are baked directly on the stone deck. This is accomplished by forming the loaves on parchment paper and then ferrying them to the oven.

Bakery ovens have a built in steam generator that allows the baker to incorporate steam into the oven at the start of baking; thus, minimizing the caramelization of the sugars on the crust. During the baking process, the steam is vented and the bread is finished in the hot dry environment of the oven.

Baguettes are not all alike. Finding one’s own technique comes from long years of practice. One of the most recognized is the award winning recipe from Jean-Noel Julien of Paris.  It does not get more authentic than that. There are only a few places to find this recipe in the US and one is right here in Arizona. Of course, it our friends at Capistrano’s. Chef Julien spent two weeks with Capistrano’s master baker teaching him the method.

Capistrano’s breads are available for order wholesale by calling (480) 968-0468 ext.1001 or visit their website here

Visit Capistrano’s Wholesale Bakery online by clicking here.

Click Here to read more Breakin’ Bread Features

Or, in Arizona, Capistrano’s artisan breads are available at Vincent’s Saturday Market on Camelback when it is open, at Holsum Outlets, and now at Luci’s Healthy Marketplace. Here are the locations.

  • Apache Junction – 10107 E. Apache Trail
  • Casa Grande – 823 N. Pinal
  • Chandler – 7275 W. Detroit
  • Peoria – 9210 W. Peoria
  • Tucson – 2801 S. 4th Avenue
  • Luci’s Healthy Marketplace -1590 East Bethany Home Road, Phoenix

 

Capistrano’s Bakery Featured Bread: Sourdough

by David Lee

By many accounts, sourdough dates back to ancient Egypt when the art of leavening bread was invented. Though the name implies bread with a sour taste, sourdough actually refers to a method of growing yeast and keeping it alive for long periods of time.

Sourdough starter, lavain, is a culture of bacteria and yeast. The primary flavor comes from lactobacilli present in symbiosis within “wild” yeast that is captured from the air. The mixture will “sour” during fermentation and will give off alcohol and carbon dioxide which will cause the bread to rise. Cultures can be passed on from loaf to loaf. The most famous culture is the San Francisco culture.

True sourdough lovers are pretty picky folks and can identify the signature taste that comes with an artisanal loaf.  You need to know your stuff when making sour dough and the bakers at Capistrano’s Bakery have it down to an art. 

So, if you need a ‘real’ sourdough fix, Capistrano’s breads are available for order wholesale by calling (480) 968-0468 ext.1001 or visit their website here

Visit Capistrano’s Wholesale Bakery online by clicking here.

Click Here to read more Breakin’ Bread Features

Or, in Arizona, Capistrano’s artisan breads are available at Vincent’s Saturday Market on Camelback when it is open, at Holsum Outlets, and now at Luci’s Healthy Marketplace. Here are the locations.

  • Apache Junction – 10107 E. Apache Trail
  • Casa Grande – 823 N. Pinal
  • Chandler – 7275 W. Detroit
  • Peoria – 9210 W. Peoria
  • Tucson – 2801 S. 4th Avenue
  • Luci’s Healthy Marketplace -1590 East Bethany Home Road, Phoenix

 

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