Category: Bread (page 1 of 2)

Capistrano’s Breakin’ Bread: Apple Danish Bread

by Emily King

The living room looks as if it has been vandalized by disgruntled Hallmark employees, the most expensive toys are already broken, and you’re wondering why anyone bothers to send electronic gifts sans batteries…

For all the joy and laughter the holiday season brings, it certainly has its difficult moments; moments best spent out of earshot and eyesight of the in-laws. My suggestion: Steal away from the “merriment” for awhile, head to the kitchen, and work a little Christmas magic of your own making a simple, gorgeous breakfast. Luckily, in this age of ready-made, gourmet foods, this is one miracle even the most inexperienced cook can pull-off.

Sure, you could spring for the “break-and-bake” cinnamon rolls or muffins in a box, but why cheapen your precious moments alone? Just think about how impressive a stack of Apple Danish or Cinnamon Raisin stuffed French toast would be. Add a few sausage links or bacon, some warm syrup, and a pitcher of juice for a hearty, homemade breakfast that will sustain your guests until you re-heat your Honey Baked Ham around 2 p.m.

Of course, a really delicious breakfast bread can be eaten all by itself (and if you’ve ever had a loaf of Capistrano’s Apple Danish Bread, you know what I mean), but using it in place of plain bread makes even the most mundane of recipes special. Since it’s the holidays and we’re feeling generous, we’ll even share our top-secret recipe for stuffed French toast; just promise us you’ll make it with love.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from your friends at into the Soup, and Capistrano’s Bakery!

Apple Danish (or Cinnamon Raisin) Stuffed French Toast

Serves 4 -8 (depending on appetite)

Ingredients:

16 Slices Capistrano’s Apple Danish or Cinnamon Raisin Bread

Butter, melted to oil pan or griddle

Cream Cheese     ½  Cup

Apple Butter         ½ Cup

Eggs, beaten        6

Heavy Cream       ½ Cup

Cinnamon            ¼ teaspoon

Nutmeg                ¼ teaspoon

Procedure:

Beat eggs, heavy cream, cinnamon, and nutmeg in mixing bowl.  Set aside.

Make apple butter and cream cheese “sandwiches” with the bread of your choice. Spread 1 tablespoon of cream cheese on one slice and 1 tablespoon of apple butter on the other. Put them together like a sandwich and cut off the crusts. Repeat this process until you have 8 “sandwiches”. Set aside.

Gently heat 1 stick of butter in a small saucepan until it is completely melted. Do not allow it to burn. Remove it from the heat source.

Heat griddle or non-stick pan over medium heat.  Brush or drizzle your cooking surface generously with the butter.

One at a time, take the “sandwiches” and dip them into the egg mixture making sure all sides are thoroughly coated. Allow excess egg to drip back into the bowl, and lay the sandwich on the cooking surface. Repeat this process, but do not over-crowd the griddle or pan.  You probably do not want to exceed more than two sandwiches in the pan at a time. You should hear a quiet sizzle as you place the sandwiches on the cooking surface.

When the first side of the sandwich is deep, golden brown, turn it over to cook on the other side. When the same result is achieved on the second side, remove the sandwich from the cooking surface and place it on a warmed plate under foil. Repeat this process for the remaining sandwiches. Keep in mind that you may need to wipe-out the pan or griddle after a few sandwiches if the butter becomes dark or burnt. Also, continue to add butter throughout the process as the bread will soak it up during the cooking.

Drizzle with melted butter, warm syrup, and a sprinkle of powdered sugar.

Visit Capistrano’s Wholesale Bakery online by clicking here.

Click Here to read more Breakin’ Bread Features

Or, in Arizona, Capistrano’s artisan breads are available at Vincent’s Saturday Market on Camelback when it is open, at Holsum Outlets, and now at Luci’s Healthy Marketplace. Here are the locations.

  • Apache Junction – 10107 E. Apache Trail
  • Casa Grande – 823 N. Pinal
  • Chandler – 7275 W. Detroit
  • Peoria – 9210 W. Peoria
  • Tucson – 2801 S. 4th Avenue
  • Luci’s Healthy Marketplace -1590 East Bethany Home Road, Phoenix

 

Capistrano’s Breakin’ Bread Holiday Edition: The Dinner Roll

By Emily King

Ahhhhtumn….The days are getting shorter, the leaves are changing color, and the sweater collection holds center stage in the closet. Time to pair them up with those elastic waistband-pants and enjoy the family, friends, and feasting that go along with the season!

Holiday gatherings offer the best noshing. That is, as long as the turkey doesn’t turn out like the one in National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. Take-away lesson: Cousins who show up in an ugly, old RV probably don’t have the equipment necessary to produce an award-winningly succulent bird. Those are the cousins who are better suited to provide that “beloved” can-shaped cranberry mold.

The spread at these gatherings is always incredible: vegetable casseroles, stuffing, gravy, meat, mashed potatoes, and, arguably the most important part of the meal, the dinner roll. Now this may seem like an outrageous claim, but just stop and remember the best dinner roll you ever had. Did it have a slightly chewy golden crust? Was the white crumb inside soft, light and airy, almost like biting into a cloud? Did a wisp of steam escape as you pulled it apart to slather on the butter? See what I mean?

The turkey or ham might be the A-List celebrity of the dinner table, but a delicious dinner roll is the loveable supporting actor that never makes it to the big leagues, but seems never to be out of work either. This is because they remain under the radar during clean up, shielded by the linen napkin lining the breadbasket. Then, four hours later as the feasters are waking from their food-induced comas, the dinner rolls are still hangin’ around ready to play their next part as the external component to the infamous sandwich. Choose your favorite meat color and whatever accoutrements and condiments tickle your fancy, grab a big glass of milk and roll yourself back in front of the TV.

Fast-forward a few days. Now, those yummy dinner rolls are ready for another transformation. It’s time to make bread pudding, croutons, or breadcrumbs to make a crispy coating for chicken cutlets. And remember, bread puddings are not just for dessert anymore. You can add salt, pepper, herbs and cheese to make a weeknight entrée that goes great with a tossed salad. (Pudding Ratio: ~2 Large Eggs per 1 Cup of Cream)

Of course, none of this is possible unless you start with a really fantastic roll. That’s when all of us here at Into the Soup turn to Capistrano’s Wholesale Bakery because waiting for dough to rise is like… well… waiting for dough to rise. Plus, that strange little dough-boy character who reps those “biscuits in a can” creeps me out.

Visit Capistrano’s Wholesale Bakery online by clicking here.

Click Here to read more Breakin’ Bread Features

Or, in Arizona, Capistrano’s artisan breads are available at Vincent’s Saturday Market on Camelback when it is open, at Holsum Outlets, and now at Luci’s Healthy Marketplace. Here are the locations.

  • Apache Junction – 10107 E. Apache Trail
  • Casa Grande – 823 N. Pinal
  • Chandler – 7275 W. Detroit
  • Peoria – 9210 W. Peoria
  • Tucson – 2801 S. 4th Avenue
  • Luci’s Healthy Marketplace -1590 East Bethany Home Road, Phoenix

 

Capistrano’s Breakin’ Bread: Bagels

by Emily King

A bagel and cream cheese, some orange juice, coffee, and a newspaper: Sounds like a wholesome “All-American” sort of breakfast, right? The bagel has become such a popular breakfast food in this country, that it is almost surprising to think that they are not an American creation at all! Contrary to what you might think, the bagel was not created in conjunction with “Philadelphia Cream Cheese”—in fact, bagels pre-date cream cheese by over 200 years!

Bagels are ring formed breads that are typically boiled before baking. They have a crisp outer layer, preventing the dough from rising beyond a certain point. Like many food products, the origin of the bagel is a little bit foggy, but a whole lot of fun if the story is true!

Folklore suggests that the bagel was designed as a tribute to Jan Sobieski, a Polish General. In 1683, this Polish General saved Vienna from invasion by the Turks, and as legend has it, the adoring townspeople clutched his stirrups (“breugels” in German) as he rode through town. The King asked a baker to design a bread-product in the shape of a stirrup to honor the general for his bravery. Overtime, the stirrup-shaped bread morphed into the rounder shape we know today, and the “breugel” became the “bagel.”

Of course, there are other explanations for the bagel’s ring-like form. Some accounts say that Russian and Polish bakers created the bagel because it was easy to skewer on long poles and sell on the street as a competitor for bublik, while others believe that it is simply a descendant of the pretzel and got its name from the German word “beignen” which means “to bend.” Heck, there are apparently Egyptian hieroglyphs showing a bagel like bread being eaten by the ancients – or was that the eye of Ra? You know what they say, “…print the legend.”

No matter which Bagel-origin theory you believe, it is clear that they became an important tradition in Polish communities. Because of their ring-shape, the bagels were considered a sign of luck and good tidings and were commonly given as gifts to pregnant women. Mothers even used them as teething rings for their grumpy, uncomfortable babies.

Polish immigrants, many Jewish bakers from Krakow, left many things behind as they traveled to America in the early 1900’s to seek out new opportunities; but luckily, they brought their bagel-making tradition. Bakers in New York, Toronto, and Montreal introduced the public to bagels and the public simply couldn’t get enough of the chewy, round bread.

The bagel has endured because of its practicality. The process of making it creates a protective outer crust that allows it to last longer then baked breads and stay fresh.  It is perfect for spreads, and it is easily transportable. Not to mention, good bagels are quite tasty.

 They became widely popular in the United States after WWII when American’s became open to new culinary influences and mass production became possible.  Today, we can find bagels everywhere—from coffee shops to delis.

They are difficult to make at home, though and can be quite messy, we don’t event try. We get ours from Capistrano’s Wholesale bakery. So, toast them. “shmear” them with cream cheese, or build a sandwich (they make great cheeseburgers), and check out our sponsor’s for all their quality breads.

Click here to read more Breakin’ Bread Features.

Visit Capistrano’s Wholesale Bakery online by clicking here.

Click Here to read more Breakin’ Bread Features

Or, in Arizona, Capistrano’s artisan breads are available at Vincent’s Saturday Market on Camelback when it is open, at Holsum Outlets, and now at Luci’s Healthy Marketplace. Here are the locations.

  • Apache Junction – 10107 E. Apache Trail
  • Casa Grande – 823 N. Pinal
  • Chandler – 7275 W. Detroit
  • Peoria – 9210 W. Peoria
  • Tucson – 2801 S. 4th Avenue
  • Luci’s Healthy Marketplace -1590 East Bethany Home Road, Phoenix

 

Capistrano’s Breakin’ Bread: Focaccia

by Emily King

For all their foibles, we have to give credit to the ancient Romans! In addition to revising the Greek political model of democracy, they created aqueducts (the inspiration behind modern plumbing), and the design-technology to create arches (where would McDonald’s be without them?).  Fashionistas should be grateful to the Romans for the sandals that were “so-in” this year, and foodies everywhere are indebted to the ancient Romans for contributing Focaccia, the yeasted flatbread that has penetrated the bread-loving communities of America.

To be fair, it is likely that the basic recipe for Focaccia was a regional recipe that was popular among many emerging Mediterranean cultures, but for simplicity’s sake, we’ll give most of the credit to the Romans since they christened it.

The name, Focaccia, is a derivative of the Latin word “focus” which means “fireplace.” The Romans cooked the bread on the hearth of a fire on a strong, earthenware tile. Focaccia gets its characteristically uneven-looking surface from the “dotting” or formation of shallow wells in the unbaked dough that the baker must make to keep the bread from forming large bubbles during the baking process. After the bread has finished baking, it is traditional to brush olive oil across the surface of the bread to preserve its moisture and improve its flavor.

Naturally, as the Romans expanded their empire, they influenced the beliefs, politics, and cultures of other nations.  Not surprisingly, these other nations held onto the tradition of making Focaccia bread. The French call it “fougasse” while the Spanish refer to it as “hogaza.” In fact, the Spanish in turn took the bread to Argentina where they started their small colony in the early 16th century. Modern Argentineans re-named the bread “fugazza” and use it as the base of their version of pizza.

As bread-making became less of a necessity and more of an art, bakers all over the world began to add savory and sweet toppings to focaccia to create the gorgeous varieties that we see in bakeries, stores, and restaurants today. Rosemary, sage, garlic, cheeses, olives, and onions are all common savory toppings. Sweet versions are less prominent in the United States, but include honey, dried fruits, baking spices, sugar, and citrus zest.

The versatility of Focaccia is one of the best things about this bread. You can dip it in infused oil, go the way of the Argentineans and make your own fluffy pizza, or make a fantastic grilled sandwich.  Whatever you do, make sure you get a good-quality loaf so you can enjoy this bread to the fullest. We can vouch for Capistrano’s Focaccia bread which comes in tomato-herb, tomato-Parmesan, and regular Parmesan varieties.

Visit Capistrano’s Wholesale Bakery online by clicking here.

Click Here to read more Breakin’ Bread Features

Or, in Arizona, Capistrano’s artisan breads are available at Vincent’s Saturday Market on Camelback when it is open, at Holsum Outlets, and now at Luci’s Healthy Marketplace. Here are the locations.

  • Apache Junction – 10107 E. Apache Trail
  • Casa Grande – 823 N. Pinal
  • Chandler – 7275 W. Detroit
  • Peoria – 9210 W. Peoria
  • Tucson – 2801 S. 4th Avenue
  • Luci’s Healthy Marketplace -1590 East Bethany Home Road, Phoenix

 

Capistrano’s Breakin’ Bread: Whole Wheat

by Emily King

Once thought to be a fad among diet enthusiasts, whole-wheat bread has come into its own as a food super-star that is recommended by everyone from personal dietitians to Mayo Clinic researchers. And the best part is, unlike some of those “healthy diet staples” out there, whole wheat bread actually tastes good. So why do whole grains leave you feeling fuller, longer anyway? Well, the magic is in the lack of processing that the grains undergo.

The grains are the seeds of the plants and include the gram, germ, and endosperm. In the process of creating whole wheat flour, the gram, germ and endosperm are ground together whereas in the process of creating typical white bread flour, the endosperm is extracted from the rest of the seed and ground by itself.  While the flour produced exclusively from the endosperm is more refined and versatile in bread-making, discarding the gram and germ eliminates excess indigestible fiber from the equation. It is this indigestible fiber that is responsible for that feeling of contentment without contributing to body tissues in the form of fat or energy, and we all know that a sated stomach keeps post-meal cravings at bay.

In addition to boasting over three times the amount of fiber, the Mayo Clinic calculates that whole wheat bread “provides 3.6 grams of protein” versus the “1.9 grams” that are present “in a slice of commercially processed white bread.” This protein keeps the body energized and boosts metabolism.

It’s wonderful to come across food that is truly “good and good for you” and Capistrano’s 100% Whole Wheat Bread is one such product. Capistrano’s breads are available for order wholesale by calling (480) 968-0468 ext.1001 or visit their website Click here.

Visit Capistrano’s Wholesale Bakery online by clicking here.

Click Here to read more Breakin’ Bread Features

Or, in Arizona, Capistrano’s artisan breads are available at Vincent’s Saturday Market on Camelback when it is open, at Holsum Outlets, and now at Luci’s Healthy Marketplace. Here are the locations.

  • Apache Junction – 10107 E. Apache Trail
  • Casa Grande – 823 N. Pinal
  • Chandler – 7275 W. Detroit
  • Peoria – 9210 W. Peoria
  • Tucson – 2801 S. 4th Avenue
  • Luci’s Healthy Marketplace -1590 East Bethany Home Road, Phoenix

 

Capistrano’s Featured Bread: Brioche

by Emily King

bri·oche (br-ôsh, – sh) n. A soft, light-textured bread made from eggs, butter, flour, and yeast and formed into a roll or a bun. 

A running joke among culinary students taking Baking and Pastry 101 is that above all, you must anticipate your cravings. You might be ready for a cinnamon roll, sticky bun, or fresh slice of brioche on Monday, but that dough isn’t going to be ready for you until Tuesday.

For anyone who has ever made quick breads and simple yeast breads, it may come as a surprise that certain bread dough, like brioche, needs more than a few hours to properly rise.  To put it simply:  not all dough is created equal—and it’s a good thing!

Unlike the Julien Baguette discussed in a previous article, brioche is rich, dense bread with a soft crust and tender crumb. It has a buttery flavor and is perfect for slicing and toasting for canapés or croutons. It is eaten all over the world as a breakfast-bread, though a more savory version of the dough is used as a casing for pate.

The difference in texture is accounted for by the addition of butter, sugar, and eggs to the mixture. It is also important to note that all purpose flour is used instead of bread flour. This is because all purpose flour has a lower gluten (protein that exists in wheat flour and causes bread to become elastic when kneaded) than bread flour. The lower gluten content causes the final product to be softer and more apt to crumble and dissolve in your mouth.

The butter, sugar, and egg-laden dough that constitutes brioche, is called enriched yeast dough. First, the sugar, yeast, flour, egg, salt and water are kneaded together to develop the gluten.  Next, after about 20 minutes, the butter is added to the mixture. Since butter disrupts the development of the gluten that gives the bread its structure, adding it too early or working it into the dough too long ruins the final product.

The dough then goes through two fermentations; first, the dough is fermented at room temperature until it doubles in size, is punched down, re-covered, and refrigerated over night to retard the fermentation process. Refrigeration also makes the sticky dough easier to handle.  After literally “chilling out,” the dough is portioned and shaped into rolls or placed in greased, Pullman loaf-pans and then allowed to undergo a second fermentation (proofing) until it has doubled in size again. The dough is then ready to be baked…and enjoyed…finally.

Fortunately, for impatient types who aren’t willing to wait until Tuesday, bakeries like our sponsor Capistrano’s are busy anticipating your cravings. Their brioche bun is a must for anyone who wants rich, sweet, egg bun. In the true French style it is a soft, sweet dough with a thin flaky crust. It’s great for burgers and sandwiches that need a little sweetness for the finishing touch. Your pork and ham sandwich recipes were made for this bun. It also compliments a plain burger perfectly. Try it today!

Visit Capistrano’s Wholesale Bakery online by clicking here.

Click Here to read more Breakin’ Bread Features

Or, in Arizona, Capistrano’s artisan breads are available at Vincent’s Saturday Market on Camelback when it is open, at Holsum Outlets, and now at Luci’s Healthy Marketplace. Here are the locations.

  • Apache Junction – 10107 E. Apache Trail
  • Casa Grande – 823 N. Pinal
  • Chandler – 7275 W. Detroit
  • Peoria – 9210 W. Peoria
  • Tucson – 2801 S. 4th Avenue
  • Luci’s Healthy Marketplace -1590 East Bethany Home Road, Phoenix

 

 

 

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